The creation of Womannequin

The rest of the torso's surface was smoothed out with more glue
mixed paper-clay.

The torso now weighs a lot less than if I had filled it with more
paper-clay, as compact paper is a lot heavier than it looks.
A couple of rasps in different sizes were really useful for smoothing
down the rough surface of the dried paper-clay.
Since I had a large pack of water damaged paper sheets I couldn't use
for anything else, I thought a nice surface for this mannequin would
be to simply glue this bright white paper onto it, something that did
look nice for a while, but was ultimately scrapped.
To make the waist coupling as perfectly flat as possible, a layer of
paper-clay was smeared onto it before sticking it down to dry on the
smooth surface of a mirror.
A piece of foam board was stuck inside a sanding belt to make a flat
surface I could sand the waist coupling with.
The lower waist coupling had a slight gap at the front that was filled
in by layering together pieces of paper in increasing sizes.
With the torso and legs fitted together, I could shape and sand both
parts perfectly flush against each other.
The head and neck were shaped and sanded flush against each other
around the neck coupling as well.
The calf of the mannequin was placed against the peg so I could trace
off where to drill a hole for the peg tube.
To make the locking keys for the shoulder couplings perfectly round, a
couple of tubes were made from laminated paper to glue inside them.
With the paper tubes glued into place, their centers were further filled
up with paper-clay.
The wrist couplings were embedded into wrist shaped pieces of
cardboard that I filled with paper-clay and stuck to the arms.
As if making the Pepakura toes wasn't bad enough, making the hands
the same way was at least twice as tedious.
As before with the toes, the fingers were slowly filled up with
paper-clay in order to let each layer properly dry and shrink.

The wrists were attached to the hands after filling up the fingers since
it was easier to fill them this way.
The locking keys for the hands were made by attaching a piece of
square bamboo into a slot on top of a couple of wooden dowels.
After drilling a hole into the wrist coupling of the hands, the locking
keys were glued into them with wood-glue and further secured with
various screws.

A few black lines were drawn over the wrist couplings to mark off
their correct rotational position.
With the shoulders snuggly fitted into place against the torso, they
could be further shaped up with more paper-clay.

A thin piece of aluminum was stuck in between the gap of the
shoulder coupling to keep the wet paper-clay away from the torso.
While the mannequin would be able to stand on its own, I still wanted
to further secure it to a spare calf peg I had by laminating pieces of
paper around it to make a peg tube.
A couple of steel rods were also hammered into the calves to
strengthen the knees.
With the legs properly strengthened, all the various holes were filled
in with paper-clay before covering the surfaces with more bright
white paper sheets.
With the legs starting to take shape, I started printing out all the
Pepakura parts that would eventually become the toes.
The toes were filled in with a small amount of paper-clay at a time in
order to let it dry and shrink properly between each layer.
To strengthen the tiny toes below the rest of the heavy mannequin, I
hammered a long board nail into each toe.
Since another set of toes were needed for the other foot, I had to
super-glue together yet another toe puzzle from hell.
The toes were secured to the rest of the feet with glue mixed
paper-clay, and a couple of long bolts to make them stronger.
Getting a visit by one of the few actual humans I know, it was very
helpful to trace around her various digits for better size reference.

Apparently the feet I had created so far were just a bit too small for
the height of the mannequin, and had to be changed.
The largest toes were separated from the others to make the foot
wider, then they were all cut off from the feet to make them longer.
Eventually the arms were filled in with paper-clay as well.
The shoulder couplings that had also been made from Pepakura parts
were slowly filled up with paper-clay.
The shoulder couplings were glued onto the arms with wood-glue.
The freshly dried paper-clay had to be extensively rasped down to
give the whole foot the proper shape and angle for this larger size.








































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A couple of long bolts were screwed into the heels to make the
ankles a lot stronger.
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Figuring out how far down into the hands the locking keys would have
to be attached was easy by inserting them into the keyhole couplings
and tracing off where it poked out of it.

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About 2 years of super-gluing later, and the tiny pieces of purple
cardstock had become a full set of toes.
Just a whole lot of paper-clay was used to reattach the toes in their
new larger configuration.
The locking keys were only screwed onto the shoulder couplings with
a couple of bolts to make it possible to remove them when having to
sand the surface of the shoulder couplings.
Just as explained before, the locking keys were removed in order to
sand the surfaces of the shoulder couplings pefectly flat.
After testing the arms on the mannequin, I thought it would be better
for tailoring purposes if the arms flaired out a bit more, so the
shoulder couplings were cut off from the arms to be repositioned.
As with most other parts of the mannequin, the drying paper-clay
would make the parts warp and bend in various directions when
drying, so one of the arms had to be extensively reshaped by cutting
grooves into it that were then filled with new paper-clay.
The keyhole couplings for the wrists were made by gluing together
various pieces of cardboard around the wooden dowels I would use as
the locking keys for the hands.
A few pieces of paper were laminated around the wrist couplings to
make them stronger.
Just to make things quicker, I held the previously made right hand in
front of a magic mirror, and pulled a finished left hand out of it.
To remove any slack and wobble in the shoulder couplings, a few
layers of paper were laminated around the locking keys.
Eventually the shoulder couplings were taking on the right shape to
simulate all the muscles around this area.

A layer of tape was also applied over them so I could further shape
the shoulder couplings on the torso against this taped surface without
the paper-clay sticking to them.
Since one of the shoulder couplings was already given the right shape,
I made a template of it that was then reversed and stapled onto the
other shoulder coupling to give them both the exact same shape.



- Jehudah Design


Along the way, I decided to make a clay sculpture of a certain face to
use as artwork reference, throwing together a random plastic skull
onto a tube of elastic straps to have something to sculpt it on.
After the face sculpt was more or less good enough to use as
reference for the artwork, I sculpted a molding rim around it so I
could save the shape of this face sculpt for later use.
As usual when I don't have access to molding silicone, I had to come
up with an alternative molding method by simply slathering on a few
layers of concrete over the face sculpt.
Making this face mold for something unrelated severely changed the
way I would finish up this mannequin after it was suggested that I
give it a face to make it easier to style wigs and other head related
gear around it.

A layer of tissue paper was glued together into the mold to essentially
make Womannequin's new unplanned face.
Since the face sculpt was never really meant for this project in the
first place, the duplicated paper face was slightly too large for the
mannequin's head.